Largest / Heaviest Tektites

I have started to compile a list of some of the largest (heaviest) tektites in the world. This is a start - loads more details to add. I'm also sure there are some very large tektites that I still do not know about! If you have any information that can help then please email me at aubrey@tektites.co.uk. Also I apologise, but I haven't sought full permissions for every photo on this page - I'm kind of assuming people will want to share their amazingly large specimens with the world! I'll take down any photos on request and also add any on request! 

 

SUMMARY

Heaviest Indochinite Muong Nong-type: Probably 29.0kg

      Heaviest Chinese Muong Nong-type tektite: 10.79kg

      Heaviest Vietnamese Muong Nong-type tektite: 2.9kg 

      Heaviest Thai Muong Nong-type tektite: Probably 29.0kg

      Heaviest Laos Muong Nong-type tektite: 24.1kg

      Heaviest Cambodian Muong Nong-type tektite: 3.2kg

Heaviest Indochinite Splashform: ?1200g (country of origin not known)

      Heaviest Chinese Splashform tektite: 411.6g (probably larger exist)

      Heaviest Vietnamese Splashform tektite: 850g (unverified)

      Heaviest Thai Splashform tektite: 456g

      Heaviest Laos Splashform tektite: no data

      Heaviest Cambodian Splashform tektite: no data

Heaviest Malaysian Splashform tektite: 464g (Probably Malaysian - not certain)

Heaviest Philippinite Splashform: 1,281.89g

      Note that Muong Nong-type tektites are not present in the Philippines.

Heaviest Indonesian Tektite: 750g (need more info)

      Heaviest Billitonite: 105.15g (I'm certain larger specimens exist)

      Heaviest Javaite: 750g (I'd like to check this out)

Heaviest Australite: 437.53g

 

Heaviest Central European tektite (Moldavite): close to 500g / 500g

      Heaviest Moravian Moldavite: 265.5g

      Heaviest Bohemian Moldavite: close to 500g / 500g

 

Heaviest North American Tektite: 200.84g

      Heaviest Georgiaite Muong Nong-type: 130g

      Heaviest Georgiaite Splashform: 86.37g

      Heaviest Bediasite: 200.84g

 


Australasian Strewnfield 

Indochinites:

Weight: 1,200g
Ranking: Possibly the heaviest known Indochinite splashform (may be a Muong Nong-type impact glass)  
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Indochina (detailed locality details no known).
Type: Concavo-convex elliptical shaped probable splashform. The surface texture does resemble that of some bubble-rich Muong Nong-type tektites/impact glasses, but the shape is more indicative of a splashform. Large chunks of obsidian that resembles tektite discs are also known from China, but it doesn't look quite the same. This specimen requires thorough testing. My personal feeling is that it is tektitic, but may be a water worn Muong Nong-type tektite/impact glass as oppose to a true splashform. The Jury is out!
Reference: Email, Meteorite Times http://www.meteorite-times.com/Back_Links/2009/february/Tektite_of_Month.htm  
Collection: John. L. Cabassi, California, USA. IMCA #2125

Note: I examined this specimen on 17 September 2012 in Las Vegas. I was unable to determine whether it was a tektite or obsidian - it needs to undergo further non-destructive testing. My feeling was that this is not a splashform tektite. It might be a rolled Muong Nong type (intermediate) tektite/impactite. I have a feeling, however, that this may be obsidian. There is something not quite right about the surface sculpture, the surface seems dulled and there appeared to be some fractures that did not look tektite-like. The Jury is still out on this one and I certainly would not dismiss this without further testing.

ABOVE: Images of John's 1200g Indochinite. Top image from Meteorite Times. Click on image for the link!

  

Weight: 582.5g
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Indochina - possibly China - I need to ask Milan.
Type: Splashform disc (symmetrical – biconcave)
Reference: Viewed by Aubrey Whymark in Brno, Czech Republic. 
Collection: Milan Trnka, Brno, Czech Republic.

ABOVE: A 582.5g Indochinite disc in the Milan Trnka collection. 

Vietnam:

Weight: 2.9 kilos
Ranking: #1 heaviest Muong Nong-type in Vietnam 
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Vietnam (no details)
Type: MUONG NONG-TYPE
Reference: Email from Erland D. Jensen (unseen by myself)
Collection: Unknown

Weight: 850g
Ranking: Heaviest splashform in Vietnam
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Vietnam (no details - ?Dalat)
Type: Splashform
Reference: Email from Erland D. Jensen (specimen unseen by myself)
Collection: Unknown

Weight: 705.8g 
Ranking: ?Second heaviest splashform in Vietnam
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Vietnam - found in 2006 in a specific place, North from Hanoi
Type: Splashform "flat dumbbell"-like dish. It has a neat black clean, almost shiny and undamaged surface on both sides, with a thin stripe crossing the "dish" in its middle, possibly somewhat related to a particular Anda-type texture.
Reference: Email Prof. Zelimir Gabelica. http://www.mail-archive.com/meteorite-list@meteoritecentral.com/msg56649.html
Collection: Prof. Zelimir Gabelica, Université de Haute Alsace, France

Weight: 700g
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Vietnam (no details). ?I think this was in a shop in Ho Chi Minh City, South Vietnam? ??Probably not the same tektite as above??
Type: Splashform (symmetrical – concave on one side, uncertain of other side)
Reference: Email from Erland D. Jensen plus photo of specimen on scales
Collection: Unknown

ABOVE: A 700g Vietnamese tektite.



Weight: 511.2g
Dimensions: 1 1/8” by 4 1/8” by 4 1/2”
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: South Vietnam (?Dalat)
Type: Concavo-convex splashform
Reference: Brian Burrer
Collection: Brian Burrer, Texas USA

ABOVE: A 511.2g specimen from Vietnam



Weight: 497.2g
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Vietnam, Dalat
Type: Concavo-convex splashform with U-groove running across convex side
Reference: Aubrey Whymark
Collection: Aubrey Whymark, Manila, Philippines

ABOVE: A 497.2g tektite from Vietnam

 
China:

I’m sure there are some very large splashform specimens from China, but I don’t know about them!

Weight: 10.79kg
Ranking: Heaviest Muong Nong-type tektite in China
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: near Wenchang, Hainan, China
Type: Muong Nong-type
Reference: Futrell D. S. and Wasson J. T. 1993
Collection: unknown

ABOVE: A 10.79kg Muong Nong-type tektite from Hainan, China. Image taken from Futrell and Wasson, 1993.

 
Weight: 411.6g
Ranking: Heaviest dumbbell
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: China
Type: Dumbbell
Reference: The Tektite Source http://www.tektitesource.com/Monster_asians.html
Collection: Norm Lehman, USA

ABOVE: A 411.6g dumbbell from China. Click on the Photo to link to The Tektite Source

   
Thailand:


Weight: 29 kg
Ranking: Possibly the heaviest Muong Nong-type tektite in Thailand and in the world.
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Purchased from Thailand
Type: Muong Nong-type
Reference: Email 15 July 2008. No further information. 
Collection: Mr Lim, Singapore

ABOVE: A 29kg Muong Nong tektite from Thailand. Owned by Mr Lim. When I see the photos I'm not 100% convinced. It's a little too vesicular for my liking - what do you think? I would love to get more info on this specimen or see it in real life.

Weight: ?28 kg
Ranking: Possibly the heaviest/second heaviest Muong Nong-type tektite in Thailand
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Thailand
Type: Muong Nong-type
Reference: Email by Dirk Ross 25 May 2007. No further information. (??Same as above 29kg specimen??)
Collection: Bangkok

 
Weight: 12.8 kg
Ranking: Heaviest well recorded Muong-Nong type tektite in Thailand and the world.
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Amphoe Khemarat, NE Thailand
Type: Muong Nong-type 
Reference: Barnes V. E. 1971
Collection: unknown

ABOVE: A 12.8 kg Muong Nong-type tektite from Thailand. Image taken from Barnes, 1971

 
Weight: 456 gms
Ranking: Heaviest reported splashform from Thailand
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Thailand
Type: not known
Reference: Email from Norm Lehman on 24/05/2007
Collection: unknown

Weight: Under 400g
Dimensions: 95x111x20mm
Ranking: --
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Thailand
Type: Oval flat-concave to bi-concave
Reference: Ebay Exotica Shop (5 Billionaires)
Collection: Exotica Shop (Mar 2009)


Cambodia:

Weight: 3,200g
Ranking: Heaviest Muong Nong-type tektite from Cambodia
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: --
Type: MUONG NONG-TYPE
Reference: Povenmire H. 2003
Collection: unknown

Weight: 630g
Ranking: --
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Cambodia
Type: Uncertain of type - Muong Nong or Splashform, but reportedly 'whole'.
Reference: Lacroix A. 1929. Sur l'existence de tectites au Cambodge; leur morphologie. Also in Beyer H. O. 1940
Collection: unknown

 
Laos:

Weight: 24.1 kg / over 24 kg
Ranking: Heaviest Muong Nong-type tektite from Laos
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: no data
Type: Muong Nong-type (fragment of larger mass)
Reference: Povenmire H. 2003
Collection: unknown. ?House of Gems in Bangkok [shop]? See Futrell D. S. and Wasson J. T. 1993 and King E. A. & Koeberl C. 1991

No Data on Splashforms


Malaysia:

Weight: 464g (when intact - now in half)
Ranking: Heaviest splashform in Malaysia
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Not Certain as found in drawer of Raffles Museum, Singapore. It may have come from Kelantan, Malaysia (Scrivenor, 1916) or Pahang, Malaysia (Beyer H. O. 1940) [Pahang is south of bordering Kelantan].
Type: Smooth sphere
Reference: Povenmire H. 2003, Koenigswald G. H. R. von 1964. Details in Scrivenor J. B. 1916. 
Collection: Raffles Museum, Singapore (in 1916) and later presented to the British Museum of Natural History (Scrivenor, 1931).

ABOVE: The 464g probable Malaysian tektite after being broken whilst trying to cut it in half. Image taken from Scrivenor J. B. 1916.

 

Philippines:
 

Weight: 1,281.89g (+/- c. 0.02g). Informally known as 'The Atom'. Not because it is small, but because my 13 month old son is called Atom and it's a similar size to his head - plus he can now say the word 'tektite' so he deserves the honour!
Ranking: #1 heaviest splashform ever found in the Philippines. Heaviest splashform tektite in the world.
Strewn Field: Australasian
Locality: Magsimalo, Paracale, Camarines Norte, Bicol, Philippines (at the time of purchase I was told Padanlan, Barangay Bagumbayan, Paracale, Camarines Norte, Bicol, Philippines, but this was probably incorrect).
Type: Smooth spheroid. No chips. 105 x 102 x 101 mm. This specimen is around 601 ml in volume so the tektite is equivalent to a 1,472.3g sphere. It must therefore contain a bubble 77.7 cm3 or 53 mm diameter. An x-ray taken on 19 September confirms a bubble 61 x 60 mm diameter. The way the x-ray is projected onto the film may make the bubble appear slightly larger - I am guessing perhaps 5% larger? The tektite itself is smaller than the 1,194.80g specimen. Taking a bubble size of 53-61mm the tektite would weigh 1,472-1,573g if solid (probably the lower end of this range). Tektites of this size should not exist - the cooling should fragment a sphere of this size. This tektite owes it's non-fragmentation to the bubble it contains.
Reference: Examined by Aubrey Whymark. Absolutely genuine. 
Collection: Private collection of Aubrey Whymark, Manila, Philippines.
History of specimen: This specimen was reportedly found by a gold panner called Ronnel Canaria who comes from Malatap Barangay, Labo Municipality, Camarines Norte Province on 23 August 2011 - it is a new find. It may have been found a few days before this I suspect as it is a remarkably quick time for the specimen to make it to Manila, but could be possible. I found out about this specimen at about 14:00 to 14:30 hrs (Philippine local time) on 24 August 2011 and immediately asked my wife to go to the bank to get a wadge of cash. I purchased this specimen late evening (around 22:00 hrs) of 24 August 2011.

 

  

ABOVE: X-ray of the 61 x 60 mm bubble in the 1,281.89g Philippinite. The dark area is the bubble. The top image shows a probable 'posterior/anterior' view, whilst the bottom image shows a probable side view.

  

Weight: 1,194.80g (+/- 0.02g). Informally known as 'The Cannon Ball' - I've been collecting thunder mugs / signal cannons lately and this is way more impressive - also spherical like a cannon ball!
Ranking: #2 Second heaviest splashform ever found in the Philippines. The largest splashform tektite ever found in terms of volume. 
Strewn Field: Australasian
Locality: Barangay Talusan, Paracale, Camarines Norte, Bicol, Philippines.
Type: Smooth Sphere, 111 x 107 x 103 mm. A volume of 643ml was recorded (although my equipment was poor), leading to the conclusion that this specimen should weigh 1,575g and therefore must contain a 66.7 mm bubble. An x-ray taken on 19 September 2011 confirmed a bubble measuring 72 x 71 mm diameter. The way the x-ray is projected onto the film probably makes the bubble appear slightly larger (maybe 5%?). Taking a bubble size of 66.7-72 mm, the tektite should weigh 1,575-1,674g (probably the lower end of this range) if it were solid. Tektites of this size should not exist as stresses in the glass, formed during the rapid cooling, would break the specimen apart. This huge specimen only exists thanks to it's bubble.
Reference: Examined by Aubrey Whymark 
Collection: Private collection of Aubrey Whymark, Manila, Philippines.
History of specimen:
05 Feb 2011: Tektite found in Barangay Talusan, Paracale, Bicol, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Ronnie, Redentor “Red” Balisa uncle, asks about a price for the tektite.
06 Feb 2011: Red communicated to his uncle about regular tektite pricing.
07 Feb 2011: I am informed by Daniel Espino that a 1,250g tektite has been found in Bicol. It is clearly a big tektite, but weights are usually exaggerated considerably by sellers.
07 Feb 2011: I speak to my regular Bicol middle man, Daniel, and agree what he is to offer and his percentage on top of that. He informs me my offer has been accepted by his uncle and he will head to Bicol that evening to pick the tektite up. Red is unaware that Ronnie is also dealing with Daniel. Later in the day the tektite is offered to Des Leong by Red Balisa for a lower price than my offer. Red does not approach me, despite me telling him I pay top dollar for such specimens. I do not contact Red as I think I am one step ahead anyway as I have agreed a deal and my man is on his way to Bicol. Later in the evening Red’s buyer, a German mineral dealer based in Munich, makes a direct offer to the uncle, which was the same offer Daniel had been instructed to make and told me had been agreed. The offer from the German dealer is accepted also. Unfortunately, unbeknown to me, Daniel did not travel to Bicol as promised and it turns out he only offered three fifths of the price I had stated so that he could keep not only his generous buyers fee, but double his money by keeping a percentage of that due to his uncle. I had asked him to increase the price as necessary to secure the specimen but he had decided to rip-off me and his uncle, probably to pay for his wedding. Despite Daniel trying to rip me off, I am disappointed at the dishonorable sellers not informing Daniel that they were now accepting another offer – ultimately Ronnie lost out as I would have increased my offer to whatever was required. If you agree a deal then I believe you either honor it or at least offer the chance to bid higher.
08 Feb 2011: Ronnie (Red’s uncle) called Red to say that his wife (Red’s Aunt) will bring the tektite to him. In the evening Red’s Aunt arrived in Manila and dealt the tektite to the buyer.
09 Feb 2011: Daniel calls me to say he did not get the specimen and it has been sold. I discover how Daniel tried to rip-off his uncle and me. My middle man has now lost all future business with me due to his dishonesty. I speak to Red as I have discovered he sold the specimen. He has already shipped the specimen abroad by Philippine postal service (!). I pray the specimen will not be destroyed or ‘lost’ as the only safe way to ship high value items is using a courier. Red has exported this specimen illegally as it requires an export permit by Philippine law (Presidential Decree No. 374) as tektites are specifically considered ‘cultural property’. You need a tax registered business to get this certificate from the National Museum. It’s a shame that Philippine heritage is destroyed on a daily basis by supposedly patriotic countrymen. Furthermore, he has sold the specimen for a fraction of its value – out of everyone who handled the specimen Red made the least by a very long shot. He’s the only one to have broken the law and he made a few hundred dollars instead of a few thousand dollars. Red will not forward my mails to the buyer or give any details. He is not sure if he shipped it to Europe or USA.
09 Feb – 16 May 2011: Despite extensive enquires the specimen cannot be located – it seems to have vanished. It would have been in the post for a few weeks, but even after that time nobody came forward as owning it. It turns out it was a mineral collector in Munich, Germany who bought the specimen. He evidently had no direct links with the meteorite or tektite community. Sometime during this period the tektite was swapped for mineral specimens with Chris Lo in Melbourne, Australia. The unknown German mineral collector made a very healthy profit in the swap!
16 May 2011: The specimen turns up on Ebay with a weight of 1,195g. It is the same specimen as the 1,250g tektite and this is confirmed from photographs taken in the Philippines that turned up on Facebook in early February. Simultaneously an email was sent to all the major tektite collectors inviting offers. I wanted this specimen badly, so I closed the deal quickly, paying more than what I would consider the tektite to be worth. Nonetheless the specimen is unique and extremely difficult to price. The specimen is shipped to Perth and later hand carried back to the Philippines. This specimen can now be safely stored (hopefully displayed in the future) and scientifically recorded and reported on. This is an important specimen for the tektite community and for the Philippines. I am afraid to say that this whole affair has not only left me out of pocket, but also with a bad feeling for the dishonesty, unpatriotic, unprofessional and unscientific attitude of local tektite dealers. This is the exact opposite of the Philippine national hero Dr. José Rizal who was the first Filipino to take a serious interest in the archaeology and natural history of his native land and after whom Beyer, in part, named rizalites. Our dealers need to take a leaf out of Rizal’s book and become more reputable, like dealers in many other Asian countries, or risk bringing their country into disrepute. Ultimately a responsible and legal business will lead to increased trade and increased value of the items – the seller benefits, the buyer benefits and the country benefits. 
 

  

 

ABOVE: 1,194.80g Philippinite from Talusan, Paracale, Bicol. The first batch of photos were found in Facebook (posted 07 Feb 2011) linked to a dealer. The second batch are from Ebay on 16 May 2011. The specimen is now in the Aubrey Whymark collection.

ABOVE: The 1,194.8g philippinite (left), which contains a 72 x 71 mm bubble, compared with the 1,018.4g philippinite (right), which contains a 14 x 15 mm bubble. The 1,194.8g specimen is the size of solid specimen around 1,600g.

ABOVE: X-ray of the 72 x 71 mm bubble in the 1,194.8g Philippinite. The dark area is the bubble. The top image shows a probable 'posterior/anterior' view, whilst the bottom image shows a probable side view.

  

Weight: 1,070.54g (also quoted at 1,070g, commonly quoted at 1,069g or 1,069.6g, also quoted at 1,065g). Informally known as 'The Monster'.
Ranking: #3 - Third heaviest splashform ever found in Philippines. Reportedly a little over 4 inches (=101.6 mm) in diameter and quoted as 1,070g in Beyer H. O. 1940.
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Bicol, Philippines
Type: Smooth Sphere. I think this specimen likely contains a small 15 mm diameter bubble, but no x-rays have been taken and I have no specific gravity - I am simply guessing that from it's apparent size it does not contain a large bubble. 
Reference: Beyer
Collection: Recovered by Beyer in April 1937 (likely found prior to the date of Beyer's visit to Bicol) (Beyer, 1938). Previously Henry Otley Beyer collection. Previously the Futrell Collection. Currently in the Corning Museum of Glass, New York State, USA. Catalogue Number 2000.7.4

ABOVE: Beyers huge 1069g tektite from the Philippines whilst still in the Beyer collection.

 

In 1999 the same 1,069g specimen appears in the Darryl Futrell collection now weighed in at 1,065g (Reference: Futrell D. S. 1999. The lunar origin of tektites. Part 2. Rock and Gem. 29 (3) March: 40-47). Darryl Futrell sadly passed away in 2001. Prior to his death a number of specimens were sold off to pay for medical bills. A bunch of specimens were also donated to the Corning Museum of Glass prior to Darryl's death. On Darryl's death Norm Lehrman of The Tektite Source acted as the agent for the family in order to sell the collection. Some specimens made it to meteorites-for-sale.com and then onwards into private collections. The main collection, with the premium pieces was sold in 2009 to an (as yet) undisclosed new impact museum in Canada. Norm Lehrman had in his hands 'The Animal' but not 'The Monster'.

ABOVE two images: In year 2000 Darryl Futrell donated a number of specimens to the Corning Museum of Glass. This tektite, cataloged as 2000.7.4, measures 10.1cm diameter and weighs 1,070.54g. The specimen is on display in the Glass in Nature exhibit. In the record it is noted that it comes from Vietnam. It was donated with Vietnamese splashforms, but I doubt this comes from Vietnam. Vietnamese tektites of this size typically form concavo-convex (or possibly biconcave or biconvex) discs - only Philippinites produce spheres in this size range. This specimen is definitely the Beyer 'Monster' and, as such, is the largest known complete Philippinite Splashform.

 

Weight: A little under 1,020g
Ranking: Uncertain. Fair possibility it is the same specimen as below based on weight and shape?
Strewn field:
Australasian
Locality: The deepest section of Coco Grove Placer deposit, Paracale, Camarines Norte, Bicol, Philippines.
Type:
‘Flattened spheroid’
Reference:
Beyer, July 1938, ‘The super-sized tektites of the Bikol Peninsula’ and Beyer, December 1938, ‘The big Bikol tektites: section II’.
Collection: Probably found Aug-Dec 1938. Reported to Beyer by D. van Eek. Pretty definite this specimen did not go to Beyer. It is uncertain whether this specimen was in the possession of van Eek – I think quite possibly not, but he certainly saw it. One gets the impression van Eek may have just reported a weight to Beyer rather than shown a specimen, but it is unclear. If this was owned by van Eek then it was likely taken to Sumatra and lost when van Eek was killed and his barracks burned and looted.

 

Weight: 1,018.40g (+/- approx. 0.03g)
Ranking: #4 - Probably fourth heaviest splashform in Philippines
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality:
Paracale, Bicol

Type: 'Sphere' - solid 416 cc.
Reference: Des Leong. Specimen personally examined by Aubrey Whymark in December 2010. I measured 1,020g on my kitchen scales, but there is a degree of inaccuracy as these are not scientific scales. Later, on scientific scales, I measure 1018.38 - 1018.43g. I measured the volume as 416 cc (expected to be 415.5 cc for a 1,018g specimen), indicating the specimen is solid. An x-ray reveals a small 15 x 15 mm bubble. I actually surprised myself with the volume measurement as I expect a larger margin of error with my crude equipment! The specimen is 103 x 93 x 82 mm, so is not a perfect sphere. It is difficult to assess if any of the surfaces are primary, but taking the area which would most likely represent a posterior surface (if any), based on curvature, the original sphere was probably 103 to 106 mm in diameter (originally 1,402g to 1,528g) - likely just off a perfect sphere, but very close. From examining this piece I would consider that it was most likely a solid sphere when it re-entered the atmosphere and has likely spalled to make it an ellipsoid. I think it is less probable that the body was distorted into an ellipsoidal shape by plastic deformation whilst still semi-molten. This is because some of the surfaces are spherical. Unfortunately it is difficult to properly determine the primary surface (if any, as it's possible that all smooth Philippinites are nuclei that have lost the breadcrust shell due to their size) as the specimen has been abraded. The tektite is smooth, and appears water worn. There is minor pitting and some etching along internal flow lines, as is commonly the case in Philippinites. The specimen is in perfect 'as found' condition, with no chips. This specimen was purchased by Des Leong in December 2010 via a middle man Leo, although it was reportedly found around 5 years ago. Originally it was said to be from Quezon Province and found around 5 years ago. Discussions with the middle man at a later date revealed it came from Paracale, Bicol, and has been in a private collection for at least 20 years. Further discussion with the wife of the seller (Alona) says it is a new find (not from an old collection) from a place called Noc Noc, Paracale, Camarines Norte. It was reportedly found by a gold panner called Renato Cina who lives in Bagumbayan Barangay, Paracale Municipality, Camarines Norte Province. Confused - I am! It is basically from Paracale, but the details are subject to confusion, but the most reliable is probably that it comes from Noc Noc, Paracale and is a new find.

Collection: Private collection of Aubrey Whymark, Manila, Philippines (formerly Des Leong Collection).

 

 

ABOVE: Aubrey's 1,018.40g Philippinite from Bicol, Philippines. The cube is 1cm. An x-ray image is seen at the bottom showing that the tektite contains a 15 x 15 mm diameter bubble in the centre.

 
Weight: 1,009g
Ranking: #5 - Fifth heaviest splashform in Philippines
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: presume Bicol, Philippines
Type: Sphere with bubble inside (so is actually the size of a theoretical specimen of 1223 grams)
Reference: Email Prof. Zelimir Gabelica http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2007-May/035147.html
Collection: Dieter

ABOVE: A 1,009g Philippinite!
 

**********

NOTE: There have been a number of reported 1 kilo plus specimens from Bicol, Philippines. These have not been seen or photographed and have not been officially weighed. Probably a few more 1 kilo+ specimens exist, but locals will often refer to an 800g plus specimen as 1 kilo, despite this size being much more common. Only specimens weighed by a reputable collector or institute can be included, not guesses by non-scientists.

*********

Weight: 995.10g  (+/- c. 0.02g)
Ranking: Sixth heaviest splashform reported in Philippines
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Barangay Casalugan, Paracale, Camarines Norte, Philippines. Reportedly found 11 August 2011.
Type: Smooth sphere. 96 x 91 x 85 mm. Contains a small 15 x 15 mm bubble.
Reference: Examined by Aubrey Whymark.
Collection: Aubrey Whymark Collection, Manila, Philippines. 

ABOVE: The 995.10g speciman and an x-ray of the 995.10g specimen revealing a single 15 x 15 mm bubble.

 
  
Weight: 991.7g
Ranking: Seventh heaviest splashform reported in Philippines
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: --
Type: -- presumably a smooth sphere
Reference: Email from Norm Lehrman on 24/05/2007. http://www.mail-archive.com/meteorite-list@meteoritecentral.com/msg56649.html
Collection: Previously the Futrell collection. ?Now Norm Lehman of The Tektite Source

Weight: 986g
Ranking: Eighth heaviest splashform reported in Philippines
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: presume Bicol, Philippines
Type: presume Sphere
Reference: Email Prof. Zelimir Gabelica. http://www.mail-archive.com/meteorite-list@meteoritecentral.com/msg56548.html  
Collection: Email Prof. Zelimir Gabelica (in 2007). Possibly has new home now.
 

Weight: 970.2g
Ranking: Ninth heaviest splashform reported in Philippines
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: presume Bicol, Philippines
Type: Smooth sphere
Reference: Personally viewed by Aubrey Whymark in April 2011.
Collection: Milan Trnka Collection, Brno, Czech Republic. Need to find out history to check this is not repeat.
 

  
ABOVE: 970.2g Philippinite from Bicol region. From the Milan Trnka Collection.

  
Weight: 967g
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: presume Bicol, Philippines
Type: presume Sphere
Reference: Email Prof. Zelimir Gabelica. http://www.mail-archive.com/meteorite-list@meteoritecentral.com/msg56548.html  
Collection: Email Prof. Zelimir Gabelica (in 2007).

Weight: 966.85g (+/- 0.03g)
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Agusan, Bicol, Philippines
Type: Ellipsoidal, 107.5 x 86 x 81 mm, Five fresh chips (25 mm, 15 mm, 11 mm, 10 mm & 10 mm diameter). Traces of white calcareous material attached to specimen, possibly serpulid??, probably indicating deposition in marine environment. Generally smooth and water worn with minor surface pitting.   Contains a small 14 x 14 mm bubble.
Reference: Examined by Aubrey Whymark 
Collection: Aubrey Whymark Collection. Specimen dug up by miner on 18 June 2011.

ABOVE: A 966.85g tektite and x-ray of the tektite, showing a 14 x 14 mm bubble.


 
Weight: 924.9g
Ranking: n/a
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Bicol, Philippines
Type: Smooth sphere with one old but large chip
Reference: Guido von Berg sales list, plus photograph.
Collection: Guido von Berg (in 2008 – may have since been sold).

ABOVE: A 924.9g sphere and 679.1g hollow sphere from the Philippines. Not sure which is which!

 
Weight: 865.11g
Dimensions: 88-89 mm diameter. Volume around 355ml (indicates solid sphere with no bubbles)
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Bicol, Philippines
Type: Smooth Sphere, no chips.
Reference: Seen and photographed by Aubrey Whymark. I bought this specimen and instantly sold to Des Leong. Des collected large specimens. This specimen later came back to my collection. 
Collection: Aubrey Whymark, Manila, Philippines 

ABOVE: An 865.11g Philippinite. Large but a couple of hundred grams short of the largest known!

ABOVE: An x-ray of the 685.11 g philippinite demonstrating a 13 x 16 mm slightly off-centre bubble. (Note actual margin of tektite is greater than can be seen in this image - the white area only represents the central part of the sphere).

 

Weight: 656.47g (hollow sphere)
Dimensions: 86-93 mm diameter. Volume around 358ml (This tektite should weigh 877g! It must contain a bubble equivalent to 55.5 mm diameter).
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Polo, near Pinagbirayan, Paracale Municipality, Camarines Norte, Bicol, Philippines. (Polo is a small island in the middle of a lake). Found end April / start May 2009
Type: Smooth Sphere, no chips.
Reference: Seen and photographed by Aubrey Whymark.
Collection: Aubrey Whymark, Manila, Philippines

ABOVE: A 656.47g Philippinite, but with a volume of a 877g specimen. This tektite contains a bubble (or bubbles) equivalent to 55.5 mm diameter. The tektite really does feel light!

ABOVE: An x-ray of the 656.47g specimen reveals a 59 x 57 mm bubble.

 

 

ABOVE: A comparison of the 865.11g Philippinite and hollow 656.47g Philippinite. The smoother one is the 865.11g specimen, which is on the right in all the photos except for the one with the city in the background and the one with me (in the checked shirt) holding the specimen.   
 

   
Indonesia:

I’d like some data here on the largest Billitonite! My largest weighs 96.2g. I’ve seen one weighing 105.15g at http://indonesian-tektites.com/BELLITONITES.htm

Weight: 750g – I’d like to know more about this – anyone?
Ranking: Heaviest tektite from Java
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Java
Type: no data
Reference: Povenmire H. 2003
Collection: unknown

Weight: 300g
Ranking: --
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Solo area of Central Java 
Type: Sphere
Reference: Beyer H. O., 1954. 
Collection: Photographed by Koenigswald G.H.R. von

ABOVE: A 300g tektite from Central Java. In 1954 this was reportedly the largest tektite from Java.


Weight: 85g
Ranking: --
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Sangiran, Java, Indonesia
Type: Fragment of ?spheroid. Note the Anda sculpture (terrestrial etching) and the 'fish-scale' texture which looks like the turbulent flow you get on the edges of the largest Australite buttons.
Reference: Koenigswald G.H.R. von 1960
Collection: Guido von Berg 

ABOVE: An 85g Java tektite - reportedly the biggest from Sangiran. Photos from Guido von Berg.

 

 
Australia:

Weight: 437.53g
Ranking: #1 Heaviest Australian Tektite. Dimensions: 83.7 x 72.1 x 54.51 mm.
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Approx. 3 Km West of Notting Railway Siding, W.A. 118 14’E, 32 27’S
Type: Broad Oval
Reference: On display at WA Museum, List from Peter Simmonds, Baker 1962, Cleverly 1974, McCall G. J. H. 2001. 
Collection: Found by P. Repacholi. Resides in WA Museum - WAM 13238.

ABOVE: The largest known Australite at 437.53g, pictured in the WAM

 
Weight: 265g
Ranking: Probably the second heaviest Australian tektite
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Australia (no details)
Type: no data
Reference: Koenigswald G. H. R. von 1964
Collection: unknown

Weight: 255.5g
Ranking: Probably third heaviest in Australia
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: Approx. 18 Km NW of Kulin. W.A.
Type: Broad Oval
Reference: Seen by Peter Simmonds.
Collection: Found by and preserved by B. West. Corrigin,W.A.

Weight: 243.08
Ranking: Probably fourth heaviest in Australia
Strewn field: Australasian
Locality: 22 Km NE of Newdegate, W.A. 119 02’E, 33 06’S
Type: Round
Reference: List by Peter Simmonds, McCall 1965, Cleverly 1974
Collection: Found by MC. Easton. Preserved in WA Museum - WAM 12318

From Australia 10 recorded in 200g to 255.5g (third largest) range. At least 65 recorded between 100g and 200g. 


Central European:

Weight: close to 500g / 500g
Ranking: Heaviest Bohemian Moldavite
Strewn field: Central European
Locality: Czechoslovakia, Bohemia
Type: --
Reference: McNamara and Bevan 2001 / Email by Norm Lehman 24/05/2007
Collection: unknown

Weight: 265.5g
Ranking: Heaviest Moravian Moldavite
Strewn field: Central European
Locality: Czechoslovakia, Moravia
Type: --
Reference: Email by Norm Lehman 24/05/2007
Collection: Unknown

Weight: 258.5g
Ranking: --
Strewn field: Central European
Locality: Moldavia, Czechoslovakia
Type: --
Reference: Email by Sterling K. Webb 24/05/2007
Collection: Unknown


North American:

Georgiaites:

Weight: 130g
Ranking: Heaviest Muong-Nong type Georgiaite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: South of Riddleville, Georgia
Type: MUONG NONG-TYPE
Reference: Povenmire H., 2007a; Meteorite Association of Georgia
Collection: Found by Robert Strange of Washington County on July 31st, 1993

ABOVE: A 130g Muong Nong-type tektite from Georgia. Image from McCall G. J. H. 2001. An excellent book - still available from the Geological Society of London.

 

Weight: 86.37g
Ranking: Heaviest splashform Georgiaite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: northern Dodge County
Type: broad oval splashform
Reference: Povenmire H., 2007a; Meteorite Association of Georgia
Collection: Fernbank Science Center

ABOVE: The largest splashform Georgiaite known at 86.37g. Images taken from The Meteorite Association of Georgia tektite page - an excellent site - do visit!

 

Weight: 70.5g (or 70.4g)
Ranking: Second heaviest Georgiaite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: Not Known
Type: splashform fragment
Reference: Povenmire H., 1997. Photo included in his book.
Collection: Unknown

ABOVE: A 70.5g Georgiaite. Image taken from Povenmire H. 2003 - this book is still available from many meteorite retailers.

 

Weight: 57g
Ranking: Third heaviest Georgiaite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: Dodge County 
Type: Circular splashform fragment
Reference: Povenmire H., 2003.
Collection: Owned by Dave Gheesling. Featured on Sean T. Murray's site fallingrocks.com

ABOVE: A beautiful 57g Georgiaite from Dodge County. Second image from Fallingrocks.com

 

Georgiaites – ‘There are no known specimens in the 60 gm range. There are about 10 georgiaites in the 50 gm range and perhaps 30 specimens known with a weight in the 40 gm range.’ (Povenmire H., 2003)

Recently a very large specimen [Georgiaite] has been reported with a possible weight of 150g. It was authenticated by a tektite hunter but has not been examined by the scientific community. (Povenmire H., 2003)


Bediasites:

Weight: 200.84g
Dimensions: 59x57x47mm
Ranking: Heaviest known Bediasite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: About 3km east of Wellborn Community, College Station, Texas.
Type: Breadcrust / grooved sphere
Reference: Povenmire H. & Burrer B., 2001; Povenmire H., 2002e
Collection: Found by Brian Burrer on Sept 18, 1996 and presume still in Brian’s collection.

ABOVE: Brian's 200.84g Bediasite. Image from Povenmire H. 2003 - this book is still available from many retailers.

 
Weight: 191g
Ranking: Second heaviest Bediasite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: no data
Type: no data
Reference: Povenmire H., 2003
Collection: Unknown

Weight: 132g
Ranking: Third heaviest Bediasite
Strewn field: North American
Locality: no data
Type: no data
Reference: Povenmire H., 2003
Collection: Unknown 


Ivory Coast:

Weight: 79g
Ranking: Heaviest known Ivory Coast Tektite
Strewn field: Ivory Coast
Locality: Ivory Coast
Type: Splashform
Reference: McNamara & Bevan, 2001
Collection: Unknown